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Lance Armstrong 30, Us 21, France 15, Robert Redford 10, Austin 8, America 8, Cnn 7, Carol Costello 6, Betsy Andreu 6, U.s. 5, Algeria 5, Hollywood 4, Ravens 4, United States 4, North Africa 4, Baltimore 4, Texas 4, George Howell 4, Tom Brady 4, Carol 4,
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  CNN    CNN Newsroom    News/Business. Latest on the day's top news stories  
   with a focus on global news, trends and destinations. New.  

    January 18, 2013
    6:00 - 8:00am PST  

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monday on "starting point" john, zoraida and i will be live on the national mall with special coverage of the president's inauguration that begins at 5:00 a.m. eastern time. thanks to our panel, we'll see you back here on monday, or we'll see you from a distance on monday.
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"cnn newsroom" with carol costello begins right now -- happening now in the "newsroom" -- the doping and the deceit. >> yes or no, did you ever take banned substances to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes. >> lance armstrong and the one big lie. >> this is too late. that's my fault. i view this situation as one big lie. that i repeated a lot of times. >> the fallout and the fury from the people around armstrong. >> you owed it to me lance, and you dropped the ball, after what you've done to me, what you've done to my family, and you couldn't own up to it, and now we're supposed to believe you? >> this morning, what happens next? is lance armstrong done for good? also ahead, hostage crisis, the fate of americans deep in the sahara desert, unclear this morning. >> this incident will be resolved we hope with a minimum loss of life. >> today, tales of terror from those who escape.
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>> duct tape over his mouth and his hands tied. >> we're live with the latest. and one-on-one with robert redford and the sundance festival he created. >> it was so big, it became almost like frankenstein's monster in a good way. >> we sit down with the film legend and talk hollywood, guns, and obama's road ahead. >> what would you like to see him do in this second four years? we're slope side in park city, utah. city, utah. "newsroom" begins now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com and good morning, thank you so much for joining us, i'm carol costello. today lance armstrong makes up in a new world, long endured by millions of americans who had no interest in bicycling before he rewrote the record books. armstrong faces a public that realizes he was a fraud, that he was lying to us all along. >> yes or no, did you ever take banned substances to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes.
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>> yes or no, was one of those banned substances epo? >> yes. >> did you ever blood dope or use blood transfusions to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes. >> did you ever use any other banned substances, like, testosterone, cortizone, or human growth hormone? >> yes. >> yes or no, in all seven of your tour de france victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. >> in your opinion, was it humanly possible to win the tour de france without doping? seven times in a row. >> not in my opinion. >> this morning we'll answer the big question, what's next for armstrong now that his reputation is in shambles. does this confession land him in new legal and financial jeopardy and can he ultimately redeem
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himself and rehab his reputation? and did oprah do the job in her exclusive interview? we begin our coverage this morning with cnn's george howell. >> reporter: lance armstrong spent years trying to outrun allegations that he used performance enhancing substances to fuel his successful cycling career. that race is now over. >> was it a big deal to you? did it feel wrong? >> at the time? >> uh-huh. >> no. >> it did not even feel wrong. >> no. scary. >> did you feel bad about it? >> no. even scarier. >> did you feel in any way that you were cheating? >> no. the scariest. >> reporter: after decades of denials, the seven tour de france winner came clean in part one of a wide ranging interview with oprah winfrey. >> i am flawed, deeply flawed.
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i think we all have our flaws, but -- and if the magnifying glass is normally this big, i made it this big because of my actions and because of my words and because of my attitude and my defiance. >> reporter: armstrong kept his emotions in check as he described years of cheating, lying, and attacking those who dare doubt him. he denied forcing teammates to dope, but did admit that they may have felt pressured to follow his example. >> i was a bully in the sense that you just -- that i tried to control the narrative, and if i didn't like what somebody said -- and for whatever reasons in my own head, whether i viewed that as somebody being disloyal or a friend turning on you or whatever, i tried to control that, that's, you know -- that's a lie, they're liars. >> reporter: armstrong now admits that he was the one telling, in his own words, one big lie, that he repeated over and over again, including this 2005 deposition. the hero to so many says that he
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realizes his confession is probably too late for many people. >> they have every right to feel betrayed, and it's my fault. and, you know, i have -- i will spend the rest of my life, you know, it's over -- some people are gone forever, but i'll spend the rest of my life trying to earn back trust and apologize to people for the rest of my life. >> cnn's george howell is in austin where he's covered armstrong for years. george, i want you first to listen to armstrong's answer when oprah asked him after years of lying, why come clean now. >> that's the best question. it's the most logical question. um, i don't know that i have a great answer. i will start my answer by saying that this is too late. it's too late for probably most people.
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and that's my fault. i viewed this situation as one big lie. >> so, george, in armstrong's hometown, is it too late? >> reporter: carol, on this, where do you start, you know? the reaction here, disappointment, anger. there are cyclists who are livid about what they heard the other night, and this goes right along with what many people in this community thought, you know, some 12, 13 years ago watching him win, it was electric in this city. people got excited. but over the years people started to become disappointed hearing about these allegations of doping. they kept it in the back of their minds, but now those suspicions are confirmed, even after he viciously attacked people, calling them liars. we now know that it was lance armstrong who was misleading quite frankly the world, carol. >> george howell, reporting live from austin, texas, this morning. and along those lines, george, many people believed armstrong not because of his
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clean recording of drug testing, he also ferociously attacked rs destroyed careers. last night on anderson cooper we heard from the wife of a former teammate who dared to accuse armstrong. >> betsy, first your inpressions on what you heard last night? >> i'm really disappointed. he owed it to me, you owed it to me, lance, and you dropped the ball after what you've done to me, what you've done to my family, and you couldn't own up to it. and now we're supposed to believe you? you have one chance at the truth, this is it. if he's not going to tell the truth, if he can't say, yes, the hospital room happened, then how are we to believe everything else he's saying? we're already questioning him. >> you were in a hospital room and you heard lance armstrong tell doctors about all the drugs that he took? >> yeah, yeah. it happened.
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>> and he denied it happened up and down, and this was a key part of a lawsuit that he ended up winning. >> yeah, that he settled with. >> right. >> but if the hospital room didn't happen, just say it didn't happen, but he won't do it, because it did happen. and if this is his way of saying -- i just don't want to go there, okay, we'll give it to her, that's not good enough. that is not being transparent. that is not being completely honest. that's skirting the issue. i want to believe that lance wants to come clean, but this is giving me an indication that i can't. >> also joining in the condemnation today the u.s. anti-doping agency, its ceo travis tygart said that lance armstrong finally admitted that he doped throughout his career and it's a small step in the right direction but if he is sincere in his desire to correct his past mistakes, he will
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testify under oath about the full extent of his doping activities. stay with us, as we drill down deeper on this story. at the bottom of the hour we'll talk to the editor in chief of "bicycling" magazine. what more can armstrong say tonight in part two of that interview? we'll discuss. now, let's move on to the crisis in north africa. a u.s. air force jet is now in algeria evacuating americans who were held captive at that gas plant. still as far as we know, the bloody efforts are still under way to free hostages taken by islamic terrorists and those hostages may include more americans. algerian state media reporting some 650 people have now been freed by special forces so far, most of them algerians. the algerian military without consulting the united states launched a raid that left nearly 30 hostages unaccounted for. but many others managed to make their way to freedom anyway. cnn's senior international correspondent matthew chance talked to the family of one terrorized victim.
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>> reporter: he's one of the few western hostages who managed to escape, and that's the brother of steven mcfaul has spoken of the terrifying ordeal. >> we just found out recently that he'd been made to sleep with a sandbag around his neck or strap around his neck, he had duct tape over his mouth and hands tied. >> reporter: according to his brother the 36-year-old electrician from belfast, with plastic explosives still strapped to him was being moved with other hostages in a convoy of jeeps when the algerian military attacked. >> there were five jeeps and the algerian army had bombed the jeeps and out of the five jeeps a bomb and four of them were hit, wiped out. and obviously they lost their lives. luckily enough for my brother, he was in the jeep that crashed and he was able to make a break for freedom with the explosives around his neck. >> i'm just really excited. i just can't wait for him to get
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home. >> reporter: this is how steven mcfaul's 13-year-old's son reacted after learning the father who he thought he'd lost was safe. >> i just can't wait. >> yeah. >> i will never let him go back there. >> and what's the first thing you'll do when you see him? >> give him a big hug and i won't let go. >> reporter: but with the full details of this hostage crisis still to emerge, there are many families waiting to hear of their loved ones' fate. that family learned that the father was coming home safely and escaped from being in the hostage situation. the algerian news agency now says that half of the 132 hostages that it had said were there have now been freed, although the agency also says that 60 foreign nationals remain unaccounted for, carol?
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>> matthew chance reporting live for us this morning. and while we don't know for sure how many americans are still being held hostage, defense secretary leon panetta is issuing a stern warning to their kidnappers. >> we are working around the clock to ensure the safe return of our citizens. terrorists should be on notice that they will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, not in north africa, not anywhere. those who would wantonly attack our country and our people will have no place to hide. >> cnn national security contributor and former homeland security adviser to president george w. bush fran townsend joins us now. welcome, fran. >> hi.
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>> we understand the united states has a plane in algeria and it's transporting americans and other westerners out of the country, some of those people are injured. do you know anything about this operation? >> no, carol. but, you know, what we're hearing is that the algerians couldn't coordinate with any of the foreign governments that had hostages on the ground. it's not all that surprising. it's not the way you want it to go if you're the american president or the british prime minister, but they acted very quickly, very swiftly, and very strongly with the lots of force. you know, you worry, that's the first question that comes to mind of those unaccounted for. there will be those who were killed in this operation, you know, not just bad guys, but inevitably when you launch this kind of military assault with this many people involved, you
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they never came. and for most of my career, there wasn't that much of that, two things changed. >> there wasn't that much of what? >> there wasn't that much out of competition testing. so you're not going to get caught, you know? because you're clean at the races.
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>> coming up you'll hear more from lance armstrong including how doping impacted his role as head of the tour de france team. police in philadelphia arrest a man they say attacked a woman on a subway station and threw her onto the track. she managed to climb back on to the platform and she's okay this morning. authorities say it was the suspect's unusual jacket caught on surveillance tape that helped them catch him. authorities are exhuming the body of a man poisoned last summer after winning the lottery. he was killed shortly after he won a million bucks and an autopsy determined he died of natural causes but later tests found cyanide in his body. in alabama snow plus freezing temperatures have made travel quite difficult. in birmingham many schools this morning are delayed. others are closed. snow was falling in mississippi,
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and drivers had to deal with the unfamiliar feel of sloppy roads. that same storm forced many schools in north carolina to cancel or delay classes. it even caused thundersnow. >> did you see that? >> oh, man. >> isn't that weird? it's a rare occurrence but lisa mcclintock caught it on cell phone video outside of greensboro and shared it with all of us. ah, sundance, the sundance film festival in full force and thousands of people are in attendance. it's one of the world's largest independent film festival, but its founder robert redford said it's getting too big. nishell turner is in park city, utah. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol, it's definitely one of those be careful what you wish for, you just might get it
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situations with robert redford. he told he when he started the sundance femme festival in 1981, it was in one theater in park city and he literally had to stand out on the street and beg people to come in and watch a movie. now you have some premieres that the lines are around the block. he says the success has been fantastic, but it's also been frustrating. take a look. you've been doing this festival for almost three decades now. >> yes. >> reporter: it's got been so large, did you ever sit back, though, and just take a moment and think, gosh, look at what this has become? >> i do. how can i not? after this thing grew and grew and grew, i thought, well, this is great. and then it wasn't quite so great. it was so big. it became almost like frankenstein's monster in a sense, in a good way. >> i was going to say almost too big? >> you work this thing, people say you can't create a human being out of mechanical parts and suddenly you do and you go,
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my god, great and then it starts to tear the house down. in a sense it's not as much fun as it used to be. >> you're not going to step away from it, this is still going to be your baby, yes? >> in terms of shepherding, yeah, it will, but not as much as it was. >> there's been so much talk these days because of the mass shootings that we've seen about gun violence and how hollywood plays a role in that, what we see on the screen, does it translate into our daily lives. what do you think about that? >> i don't know. i don't know. i think that -- first of all, violence has been in films since they were invented. it's been there all along. so, obviously that's part of our culture and the films reflect that culture, that's what they do. so often we see guns in ads. does that mean that guns bring business to the box office? if they become part of marketing, does that mean that it's been proven, it's been documented to the powers that be that guns in an ad will create
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more business? i don't know. i mean, to me, it's not a -- it's not a statement. it's a question. but i think it's a question that hollywood could ask itself. >> the president will be sworn in for his second term on sunday. one of the criticisms for the first term were people saying he didn't pay enough attention to environmental politics. what would you like to see him do in this second four years? >> i would like to see him pay more attention to environmental issues. i think it's too dire. i think the situation is too dire, the law of entropy is so extreme right now, the planet is shrinking, it's being divvied up, carved up, dug up. what are we thinking about future generations? are we going to leave them anything? >> i just wanted to ask you another question about your gun question to robert redford. >> reporter: sure. >> he appeared very thoughtful. at least there's a conversation that seems to be going on, if not any sort of resolution. >> reporter: yeah. yeah, you know, and one of the
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things he said and it actually kind of surprised me was that he does believe government and hollywood should play a role together in this conversation. he does believe that the government should come in and really kind of look at what's going on in hollywood. now, he definitely defends a filmmaker's right to make whatever film there is, but he believes that the conversation is about time that it's had. >> interesting. we'll get more from you in the next hour of "newsroom." lance armstrong was hoping to win over the public, well, he may have way missed the mark. what did you take away from the armstrong interview? it's our "talk back" question of the day. tweet me @carolcnn. this is america.
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now's your chance to "talk back" on the biggest stories of the day, the question for you this morning, what did you take away from the armstrong interview? we are so over you, lance. so over. after the interview the backlash was quick and fierce. yahoo! called it a sociopathic spectacle, adding if you never met this jerk, well, count your blessings. armstrong told oprah he couldn't even remember how many people he sued in effect for telling the truth. it says a lot about a man when on his own apology tour he's not sure who to apologize to. the wife of three-time tour de france winner greg lemond said, quote, i can't describe to you the level of fear he brings to a family, other than to liken it to a drunken, alcoholic, abusive spouse who gets out of jail with a bouquet of roses for his bloodied spouse saying, here, i'm sorry i did that. betsy andreu, the wife of former
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teammate frankie andreu who testified she heard armstrong admit to doping. for years armstrong buried her in insults calling her crazy and burying her husband's career. armstrong said he couldn't talk about much of that conversation. >> i think she'd be okay with me saying this, but i'll take the liberty of saying and say, listen, i called you crazy, i kald you a bitch and i called you all these things, but i never talked you fat. >> talking about digging the hole deeper. well, lance, betsy andreu is definitely not okay with that. >> this is a guy who used to be my friend who decimated he. he could have come clean. he owed it to me. he owes it to the sport that he destroyed. >> but it's not just about the sport armstrong may have destroyed, it's about the lives he destroyed through years of bullying and legal retaliation, the victims, often friends and
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teammates, left with careers and reputations ruined. and bank accounts depleted. "talk back" for you today, what did you take away from the armstrong interview? facebook.com/carolcnn, facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me @carolcnn. i'll be right back. aig? we said we were going to turn it around, and we did. woman: we're helping joplin, missouri, come back from a devastating tornado. man: and now we're helping the east coast recover from hurricane sandy. we're a leading global insurance company, based right here in america. we've repaid every dollar america lent us.
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everything, plus a profit of more than $22 billion. for the american people. thank you, america. helping people recover and rebuild -- that's what we do. now let's bring on tomorrow. [ male announcer ] end your long week... with a weekend getaway. save up to forty percent on all weekend hotel stays. book by january thirty first at hiltonanyweekend.com. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create
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custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. good morning to you, i'm carol costello, thank you so much for being with us. it's 30 minutes past the hour. lance armstrong did more than sit down with oprah, he reached out to some of the people who accused him of doping, one of them betsy andreu, armstrong called her up, and apologized for 40 minutes for maligning her reputation and destroying her husband's cycling career. listen to what she told cnn's anderson cooper. >> i want to believe that lance armstrong wants to come clean, but this is giving me an indication that i can't. >> i want to play the exchange
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he had with oprah where he is specifically talking about calling you. let's play it down. >> have you called betsy andreu? >> yeah. >> did she take your call? >> she did. >> she did. was betsy telling the truth about the indiana hospital, overhearing you in 1996? >> i'm not going to take that on, and i'm laying down on that one. >> was betsy lying? >> i'm just not -- i'm going to put that one down. i don't want to -- she asked me and i asked her not to talk about -- >> what you said? >> -- the details of the call. it was a confidential, personal conversation. it was 40 minutes long. i spoke to frankie as well. >> is it well with the two of you? have you made peace? >> no. >> okay. >> because -- because they've been hurt too badly. and a 40-minute conversation isn't enough.
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and it -- >> yes. because you repeatedly characterize her as crazy, called her other horrible things and -- >> well, and i clarified something. i did call her crazy. >> you did. >> i did. i did. >> if you would go back and look at all the tapes and things you said over the years about betsy -- >> and i -- and i think she'd be okay with me saying this, but, i mean, i can take the liberty to say it and say, listen, i called you crazy, i called you a bitch, i called you all these things, but i never called you fat. >> that's one of the things she said -- >> she said i thought you were acting crazy but -- >> well, i guess i was all these years putting up with that. how would you act? sweet as apple pie? >> the idea that somehow not calling you fat is any kind of -- >> consolation? >> yeah. when i heard that, my jaw dropped. >> he shouldn't have done oprah.
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he should -- this was too big to -- he shouldn't -- he shouldn't have gone on here. this is going to be a long process for him. but he's approaching it the wrong way. what -- that exchange right there, it has me furious. i -- bill, help me out, i mean, what is going through his mind? >> it's fascinating to me that -- betsy and i have been talking about the exchanges, and it's just fascinating to me that he took that step, which everyone would think would be the hardest to say i doped, i cheated, it was all a lie, and yet when it comes to details about other people, he just can't -- he can't quite get himself there. >> kneel rogers is editor in chief of "velo news" a cycling magazine, he joins us now from boulder, colorado. good morning. >> hi, good morning. >> okay. so, if lance armstrong thought this interview might make people
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like him better, i mean, come on! >> yeah. i think if you were to grade armstrong's performance last night, you'd have to give him somewhere along the lines of a "c" minus or a "d" plus, and i used that word performance intentionally because i believe that's what it was. it didn't feel sincere. we didn't actually really hear apologies per se, it was a confession. but i think the whole thing has been very carefully crafted, and it was ultimately self-serving although not serving himself as much as he might have liked. >> it kind of makes you wonder if everyone in the sport of cycling is like lance armstrong. >> oh, no, i think that's a huge generalization. lance was a one of a kind. he was a single minded, focused, win at all costs kind of guy, and that's part of what has made
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him such an enigma and such a celebrity, really, you know, he would do whatever it took and back it up with his athletic ability and the cancer background made him a perfect storm. >> you know, armstrong's been eviscerated, banned from the sport, he may go to jail. he'll certainly have to pay back large sums of money. i know this is bad for your sport right now, but in the end, might it be good in the long run? >> that's my hope. i'm a big believer in the truth. i think the truth always comes out and it shall always set you free. covering the sport over the last decade, it's been tough. you talk to riders and you suspect there's more going on behind the scenes than they can let on or -- it used to be that way a lot more. it actually has changed quite a bit over the last four or five years. it's important to remember that a lot of what armstrong was talking about happened between '99 and 2005 when he won those
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seven tours. but, yeah, i think in order for the sport to move forward, there needs to be a cleansing process, and armstrong profited the most from the doping era in cycling, so he needs to be made an example. >> well, it's interesting, because i was thinking if baseball would treat players who take performance enhancing drugs like armstrong, would there be a problem in baseball anymore? >> well, yeah. and that's part of the problem for cycling is that it's under the olympic movement. other sports like track and field and swimming as well, they're sports that probably wouldn't exist in the same way without the olympics versus sports like baseball, football, basketball, which are unionized and privatized and they exist in a completely different realm in terms of finance. and so, you know, the athletes from these sports, they're tested more and they're out of competition, in competition. there's going to be more positives. but cycling with its biological
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passport program is actually pioneering the way forward in terms of keeping athletes honest, but it's a tough process and there's going to be some collateral damage. >> i'm sure. neal rodgers, editor in chief of "velunews" magazine. thank you so much for being with us today. >> thank you. we've heard what lance armstrong had to say, but what did his body language have to tell us? coming up in the next hour we'll dialogue his every move with a expert. coming up the next hour. and "the world according to lance armstrong"armstrong" airs and sunday night. it's a $13 billion company and the world's largest retailer of organic grocery products, but the ceo of whole foods said his fellow corporate leaders should change the way they do business.
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lance armstrong wasn't just a phenomenal cyclist in his own right he was the leader of a team that worked as a unit to win seven tour de france titles. as the top rider lance had a lot of power to force his teammates to cheat, but did he? here's what he said to oprah about that.
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>> were you the one in charge? >> well, i was -- i was the top rider. i was the leader of the team. i wasn't the manager, the general manager, the director, the da da da. >> but if someone was not doing something to your satisfaction, could you get them fired? >> it depends what they're doing. i mean, if you're asking me somebody on the team says i'm not going to dope -- >> yeah. >> -- and i say you're fired? >> yes. >> absolutely not. >> could you? >> could i? i guess i could have. but i never did. look, i was the leader of the team, and the leader of any team leads by example and there was never a direct order or a directive to say you have to do this if you want to do the tour, if you want to be on the team. that never happened. it was a competitive time. we were all grown men. we all made our choices. but there were people on the team that chose not to.
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>> the international olympic committee has stripped lance armstrong of his 2000 bronze medal and this morning the group released a statement, we now urge armstrong to present all the evidence that he has to the appropriate anti-doping authorities so that we can bring him in to the dark episode and move forward, stronger, and cleaner. 43 minutes past the hour, time to take a look at other stories we're watching right now in the "newsroom" -- authorities at miami international airport are trying to figure out why two planes bumped into each other on the runway. no one was hurt when an airbus 340 arriving from argentina clipped a boeing 777 headed for paris. about 350 passengers en route to paris had to switch planes for the trip. luckily, no one was hurt. now, this is a bold move. the wife of the former mayor of detroit is asking for donations to keep the couple's sons in private schools. the ex-mayor kwame kilpatrick
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owes detroit $750,000. he stole it from the city. he's not allowed to solicit donations but his wife is. in a letter carlita asked friends and family to help her with tuition payments. she's asking to raise $20,000. talk about a direct hit, workers at an auto repair shop near san diego showed up at work to find a five gallon bucket of cleaning solution had crashed through the roof. it turns out the container slid out of an open hatch of a military plane that had taken off from a nearby marine corps air station. the marine corps has agreed to pay for the repairs. inauguration fever spreading in washington. officials are handing out tickets to the big events including monday's parade and the official inaugural balls, the 800,000 people with or without tickets expected to show up for the big show. and this just this morning the white house unveiled president obama's new official port trat, you're looking at it
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on your screen, it's a photograph taken in the oval office. the president is wearing a great big smile and an american flag pin on his lapel, and his hair is a little grayer than in his first portrait. for years we've heard the term conscious consumer, but my next guest says now is the time for big business to follow the lead of its customers and work to make an impact that goes for beyond the bottom line. he's john mackey, ceo of the multibillion dollar retailer whole foods and co-author of "conscious capitalism, liberating the heroic spirit of business." good morning, john. >> good morning, carol. >> we're happy you're here. >> happy to be here. >> before we get into the book, and it sounds like a great book, i'd like to address something you said about obama care, the president's health care plan. you initially labeled the health care act a form of socialism and then on npr you called obama care fascism, why did you decide to change the terminology? >> clearly that's a bad choice of words.
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traditionally socialism means production run by the government and in fascism the means of production are still owned by private individuals but they're controlled by the government. and what's happening is our health care plan -- our health care system's moving away from free enterprise capitalism towards greater governmental control. that was a poor choice of words due to the baggage and associations that go along with it. so, now i'm just calling it government-controlled health care. >> and you realize when you say fascism it brings up nazi germany and all sorts of things. >> yes. >> and we really want that language out of the public forum at the moment, don't we? >> apparently you cannot use that word anymore in america, it's taboo. be careful, you just used it. >> i did. some of your customers expressed outrage on the whole food facebook page. of course, he regrets his word choice. it affects his bottom line. i don't believe this apology any
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more than i believe mitt romney trying to get out from under his 47% comment. care to comment to that customer? >> everyone is entitled to their own beliefs, this is america. >> why inject yourself into the debate? >> whole foods has team members that we provide insurance for and the changes in the law greatly affect us. it's raising our costs. it's making it more difficult to provide the insurance at affordable rates to our team members so i'm trying to protect them as well as i can. >> i think, though, that many of your customers probably wouldn't agree with you since, i don't know, you kind of run a store that appeals to the more liberal in america in some ways. >> i don't understand what your question or your point is so -- >> i'm just saying some people feel whole foods is a politically correct grocery store because you sell organic foods, you're into health, et cetera, et cetera and some of
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your customers might be taken aback because of -- because of that. >> they might be. i mean, whole foods is a very diverse company. we have multiplicity of opinions. again, we're the united states. we have freedom of speech. we're a democracy. we need to have a variety of opinions shared in order for us to remain a vital and prosperous country. >> so i want to talk about your book now, because some of the points you outline are quite good. you call it conscious capitalism. can you explain what you mean by that? >> conscious capitalism is a better way to do business. it's a way to recognize that every business has the potential for higher purpose beyond just the bottom line, beyond just making money. and it's a strategy for companies to create value for all of their stakeholders, not just their shareholders, their customers, their employees, their suppliers, their investors and their larger communities. so, it's -- there are many
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companies that practice conscious capitalism, companies like whole goods, like google, like southwest airlines, like nordstroms, there's a number of them out there, and they're very successful in the marketplace. this is -- this is working and so we're trying to spread that message to other businesses so they can share in this -- in our success. >> and you also say that companies have to kind of not forget about the bottom line because you can't do that, but they can't owe all of their allegiances to shareholders. they have to care about others, too. what do you mean by that? >> a simple example might explain it. you take a retailer like whole foods markets, our way we're successful is that we take care of our team members. we make sure that our employees, our team members are happy in the workplace, they're floorishing afloorish i floorishing and they take care of the customers and the business flourishes and that makes happy investors and we have to consciously make value
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for our team members and our customers and that creates value for our shareholders. by doing that the business flourishes along with all the stakeholders that voluntarily trade with the business. >> in line with that just a last question for you, the wage gap in this country is so large, and by what you just said, included in that, does that mean paying your employees a good wage and health care and those kinds of things? >> we do. whole food has an excellent health care plan. we have a salary cap of 19 times the average pay which i think is pretty unprecedented for a fortune 500 company. we pay well for a retailer. our team members are happy. our turnover rates are very low. we've been named one of the 100 best companies to work for for 16 years now. >> john mackey, thank you so much for being with us this morning. we appreciate it. >> thank you. in his own words, lance armstrong comes clean, sort of. >> was it a big deal to you? did it feel wrong?
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>> at the time? >> uh-huh. >> no. >> it did not even feel wrong? >> no. scary. >> "talk back" question today, what did you take away from the lance armstrong interview? facebook.com/carolcnn. i'll be right back. e, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure.
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men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications, especially insulin, corticosteroids, or medicines to decrease blood clotting. so...what do men do when a number's too low? turn it up! [ male announcer ] in a clinical study, over 80% of treated men had their t levels restored to normal. talk to your doctor about all your symptoms. get the blood tests. change your number. turn it up. androgel 1.62%.
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i don't want to -- i don't want to accuse anybody else. i don't want to necessarily talk about anybody else. i made my decisions. they are my mistake. and i am sitting here today to acknowledge that and to say i'm sorry for that. >> "talk back" question today, what did you take away from the armstrong interview? he's an arrogant, self-loving man. i lost all respect for him. his confession was self-serving and insincere. from bernadette, unrepettant. just sorry he got caught. who cares? the guy had cancer. was he shooting heroin?
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move along. he's toast. he's forfeited his right to any public place other than a place of scorn. thanks for the cancer funds. now go away and hide in shame. this is from darryl, this is mostly politics, european cyclists are terribly anti-american, they were all doing doping at the time. what's next? he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes
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in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet, or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. see your doctor, and for a 30-day free trial, go to axiron.com.
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the nba superstar lebron james is now working on his next 20,000 plateau, leading the heat into l.a. to take on kobe bryant and the lakers. lebron scored early and he scored often, totaling 39 points. the lakers pulled even in the fourth quarter and miami ran off the game's final nine points, heat win 99-90. arizona cardinals have hired bruce aryians as their head coah and that means all eight nfl vacancies have now been filled but not one of the hires since the end of the regular season is african-american and that's not going down well. mike freeman of cbssports.com says i can tell you there is great outrage among the black assistant coaches i spoke to thursday night, i mean extreme anger. freeman said coaches of color have been unable to break into the nfl's old boy network in significant numbers. and leave it to a minor
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league sports team to poke fun while trying to make a buck off a trending news story, the latest case the manti te'o girlfriend hoax. the freedom has announced it will have manti te'o girlfriend bobble head night during a game this season. fans will actually get an empty bobble head box, one section of the park will be reserved for them to sit with their imaginary girlfriends or boyfriends and a pretend kiss come and for the kids, an madge right hand fistfight. i don't know. eight, ten years. i couldn't tell ya' but things were a lot less expensive back then. if you're 50 or over you should take a new look at your auto insurance. you may be overpaying. actually that makes a lot of sense. old policy. old rates. and thanks to your experience behind the wheel, you might save $350 by switching to the
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and you offer savings to switch. it's unbelievable! if you're 50 or over call now to request your free quote. i'm gonna call. i'm calling. i'm calling. i'm calling. call today and make the switch to the aarp auto insurance program from the hartford. why wait? stories we're watching right now in the "newsroom," lance armstrong finally admits to doping, but his body language tells another story. learn what lance was really saying when he wasn't talking.
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plus this -- >> i think if there are no guns on the street no one could get hurt. >> small in size but big in impact. white house posts kids reading letters to the president on its website adding controversy for putting children on the political stage. plus this -- >> i'm nichelle turner very live at the sundance film festival where we're going one-on-one with the creator, hollywood icon, robert redford. he's a huge fan, really. >> he'll do a great job when he steps in because gronk's hurt. >> mr. mayor that would be gronk with an "r." menino flubs the sports stars once again. "newsroom" starts now. good morning, thank you so
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much for being with me. i'm carol costello. lance armstrong talks and one of the great stories in sports is exposed as a fraud. after years of denials, the bicycling legend now admits that illegal doping fueled his superhuman feats, his seven tour de france titles, his record-setting times and his ferocious claims of innocence all lies. this hour we'll hear from people in austin, texas, are they sticking by their hometown hero? an expert in body language will also weigh in. are the words telling the whole truth. we want to hear from you, our "talk back" question this morning, what did you take away from the armstrong interview. let's listen -- >> yes or no, did you ever take banned substances to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes. >> yes or no, was one of those banned substances epo? >> yes. >> did you ever blood dope or use blood transfusions to enhance your cycling performance? >> yeah. >> did you ever use any other
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banned substances like testosterone, cortizone, or human growth hormone? >> yeah. >> yes or no, in all seven of your tour de france victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. >> in your opinion, was it humanly possible to win the tour de france without doping, seven times in a row? >> not in my opinion. >> for 13 years you didn't just deny it, you brazenly and defiantly denied everything you just admitted just now, so why now admit it? >> that's the best question. that the most logical question. i don't know that i have a great answer. i will start my answer by saying that this is too late. it's too late for probably most
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people. and that's my fault. you know, i view this situation as one big lie. that i repeated a lot of times. >> you said to me earlier you don't think it was possible to win without doping. >> not in that generation. and i'm not here to talk about others in that generation. it's been well documented. i didn't invent the culture, but i didn't try to stop the culture and that's -- that's my mistake and that's what i have to be sorry for and that's what's something -- and the sport is now paying the price because of that. so i am sorry for that. >> how did it all work? >> i viewed it as very simple. i mean, you have things that were oxygen-boosting drugs for lack of a better word or way to describe it that were incredibly
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beneficial for performance or endurance sports whether it's cycling or running or whatever, and that's all you needed. i mean, my -- my cocktail so to speak was only epo, not a lot, transfusions and testosterone, which in a weird way i almost justified because of -- because of my history, obviously with having testicular cancer and losing, surely i'm running low. >> were you afraid of getting caught? >> no. drug testing has changed. it's evolved. in the old days they tested at the races. they didn't come to your house. they didn't come to your training camps. they tested you at the race. that's shifted a lot. now the emphasis of the testing -- which is right -- is
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in out-of-competition testing. >> and in 1999 there wasn't even a test for epo. >> there was no testing out of competition. theoretically there may have been, but they never came. and for most of my career there wasn't that much of that. so, two things changed -- >> that much of what? >> there wasn't that much out-of-competition testing. so, you're not going to get caught, you know? because you're clean at the races. >> were you the one in charge? >> well, i was -- i was the top rider. i was the leader of the team. i wasn't the manager, the general manager, the director, the da da -- >> but if someone was not doing something to your satisfaction, could you get them fired? >> it depends what they're doing, i mean, if you're asking me somebody on the team says i'm not going to dope -- >> yeah. >> -- and i say you're fired? >> yes. >> absolutely not.
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>> could you -- >> i mean, could i? i guess i could have, but i never did. look, i was the leader of the team, and the leader of any team leads by example and there was never a direct order or a directive to say you have to do this if you want to do the tour, if you want to be on the team. that never happened. it was a competitive time. we were all grown men. we all made our choices. but there were people on the team that chose not to. >> were you a bully? >> yeah. yeah. i was a bully. >> tell me how you were a bully. >> i was a bully in the sense that you just -- that i tried to control the narrative, and if i didn't like what somebody said -- and for whatever reasons in my own head, whether i viewed that as somebody being disloyal or a friend turning on you or whatever, i tried to control
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that and say that's a lie, they're liars. >> lance pugmeier spoke to some of the people that armstrong discredited. he's a sports reporter for "the los angeles times." welcome, lance. >> thank you, carol. >> we read a lot of your articles. one quote from one of those articles incredibly powerful i want to read it to our viewers. it comes from the wife of greg lemond the three-time winner of the tour de france and a longtime accuser of armstrong's doping. she says, quote, i can't describe the level of fear he brings to a family other than to liken it to an alcoholic abusive spouse who gets out of jail with a bouquet of roses for a bloody spouse saying here, i'm sorry, i did that. to many people perhaps the way he treated his accusers is worse than his cheating. >> absolutely. and i think that in talking to some of those people after his interview with oprah, they still have a lot of resentment about, you know, the fact that he could
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have gone a little bit further in this interview to really deepen his apology to people like the masseuse who came forward and provided some information about him backdating a prescription for cortisone to dodge a test. the way he treated a former teammate and very close friend, frankie andreu and his wife betsy, after they came forward and said that they heard him admit to taking performance enhancing drugs back in 1996 in a hospital room while he was under going cancer treatment. and then again, greg lemond and his wife, kathy, who armstrong did a lot to basically help separate lemond from a bicycle company that he had started. so, you know, there's still a lot of bitterness, and they felt like in regards to his quest for absolute forgiveness that he fell short in what he said to oprah last night. >> well, it makes you wonder if they could take any legal action or at least try to take legal action against armstrong. >> well, you know, that does
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exist in a couple forms. there's a whistle-blower case that had been filed by armstrong's former teammate floyd landis claiming that armstrong defrauded the u.s. postal service in regards to, you know, his use of performance enhancing drugs to win and basically sullied the postal service's name, and then there's also a potential lawsuit that could be filed as soon as today by a company that had backed a bonus -- multimillion dollar bonus that armstrong received for winning the tour de france in 2004. so, those things could all be at play in addition to what you're saying, you know, perhaps some defamation here. >> okay, so i'm sure you sat down, you listened to the entire interview. will you sit down again tonight and listen to another hour and a half of lance armstrong? >> yes. yes, i will. >> if you didn't have your job to do, if you were a normal citizen and not a journalist, would you? >> you know, i think it is interesting moving forward
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because this guy -- he was such a legend. he was held up as a especially hero, and it is interesting to hear about basically the downfall of lance armstrong. i mean, this guy put himself up there as this cancer survivor who won the most grueling race in the world, and to talk about what he was thinking and where he goes from here, i think that will be interesting. i think that the -- one of the things that lance touched on yesterday was the information about out-of- -- out-of-competition testing that can be done. i think that applies not just to the world of cycling but in many sports across the board and i think that's why the u.s. anti-doping agency wants to sit down and talk to him. this could be something that could change the way drug testing is done throughout all sports. so, i think that there is some value in his story of how he cheated. >> yeah. let's hope major league baseball is listening, right? thank you so much.
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thank you so much for joining us this morning. armstrong stirred a lot of anger within competitive racing by saying doping was an essential part of the sport like putting air in the tires or refilling a water bottle. >> was it a big deal to you? did it feel wrong? >> at the time? ? >> uh-huh. >> no. >> it did not even feel wrong. >> scary. >> did you feel bad about it? >> no. even scarier. >> did you feel in any way that you were cheating? >> no. the scariest. >> cnn's george howell is in austin where he's covered armstrong for many years, so, george, what's the reaction there? >> reporter: well, carol, look, you know, people are asking was this believable, you know, he said all the right words, but was it sincere? is he truly apologetic and does it really make a difference?
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you asked some people here, they say no. there are others who are disappointed in what they heard, cyclists here, there are many who are livid about that interview last night. a lot of people watched it here in austin, texas, and take a listen to what some of those people had to say about that interview -- >> i'd like to think that at some point, you know, he would be forgiven but the reality is i think he burned those bridges a long time ago. i think he's a -- i think he's a cheater, you know, i think he's a cheater. i don't know how else to say it. >> in austin really it's not news to us. i want to love lance. i still love him i guess at heart, but i think it's really shady that he kept this from us for so long. >> personally i think whatever they're putting into their body is their choice, and i think if everyone's doing it, whoever's the best at it, the best cheater, should win and that's obviously what happened right here. i mean, he's still got to train and everything it's not like he
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took a drug, went out and rode his bike. >> reporter: definitely anger here in his hometown about lapse armstrong now a fraud in many people's eyes. but there's also some mixed feelings here, you know, when you think about all the work that he's done for cancer research, with livestrong there are a lot of people who say, you know, we shouldn't lose sight of the good work that he did do during his career and even lance himself, carol, in that interview he described himself as a jerk on one hand but a humanitarian on the other hand, and that's really the lance armstrong that a lot of people here in austin, texas, came to know. >> all right, george howell reporting live from austin. george mentioned livestrong. we have a statement from armstrong's former foundation because, you know, he has stepped down. quote, even in the wake of our disappointment we also express our gratitude to lance as a survivor for the drive, devotion, and spirit he brought to serving cancer patients and the entire cancer community. our success has never been based on one person. it's based on the patients and
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survivors we serve every day. stay with us. we have plenty more coverage of lance armstrong's admissions to oprah winfrey. did you notice this during lance's interview? how often he touched his face? in about 15 minutes we'll talk to a body language expert who will tell us what that means. and tomorrow cnn takes you inside the case against lance armstrong "the world according to lance armstrong" airs saturday night 7:00 and 10:00 eastern. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily.
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women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications, especially insulin, corticosteroids, or medicines to decrease blood clotting. so...what do men do when a number's too low? turn it up! [ male announcer ] in a clinical study, over 80% of treated men had their t levels restored to normal. talk to your doctor about all your symptoms. get the blood tests. change your number. turn it up. androgel 1.62%.
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notre dame's manti te'o is not yet answering questions about his imaginary girlfriend, he's in florida and training for the upcoming nfl combine and
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he's silent today. but we are hearing from the father of a former high school quarterback reported as the man behind the girlfriend hoax. here's cnn's brian todd. >> reporter: it was a hoax made all the more believable by his hushed mournful interviews like the one he gave espn. >> i -- i -- you know, i never felt that way before. this is six hours ago i just found my grandma passed away, and you take, you know, the love of my life, the last thing she said to mow was i love you. >> reporter: but manti te'o's supposed girlfriend lennay kekua who reportedly died of leukemia never existed. te'o and notre dame said he was the victim of the hoax. who perpetrated it deadspin.com, that broke the story, pointed to a man named ronaiah tuiasosopo,
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and deadspin citing friends and relatives of tuiasosopo spread it online. >> they said he's been doing the fake profile for several years and he's caught other people in his trap but they caught on way earlier than manti te'o did. >> reporter: cnn cannot confirm tuiasosopo's involvement. we went to addresses and called numbers in southern california listed for ronaiah tuiasosopo and could not reach him. we caught up with his father, titus, a former football player at usc now a pastor at a place called the oasis christian church of the antelope, he's seen here on facebook. he wouldn't speak on camera but told us the truth will all come out. god knows our character. ronaiah tuiasosopo's uncle who gave us pictures of him as a child says that he's religious and plays in a band at his father's church. >> i know the kid all his life,
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and this is the first time i heard something like that. >> reporter: deadspin said tuiasosopo and manti te'o know each other, the athletic director asked if they were cousins or family friends. >> that characterization does not square with my position, but i'll let the te'os address it. >> reporter: we could not reach manti te'o, his parents or agent for comment. tuiasosopo is a former player himself seen here as a quarterback at antelope valley high school, he has relatives who played college and pro football. i spoke on the phone with marcus tuiasosopo, a former quarterback for the oakland raiders and the new york jets, marcus said he's a distant cousin of ronaiah tuiasosopo, marcus said he didn't want to tape an interview. he said he can't say anything about this story and doesn't know him well, but marcus did say that he and his family know the te'o family. who is the woman depicted in social media photos as manti te'o's girlfriend? a woman we contacted whose name
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we are not airing said her picture had been used for a fake facebook page for te'o's girlfriend. she said she's shocked to know he might be involved. brian todd, cnn, washington. >> wow. we'll keep you posted. just unbelievable. the interview that everyone's talking about today, and the lance armstrong confession is the topic of our "talk back" question. >> i made my decisions. they are my mistake. and i am sitting here today to acknowledge that and to say i'm sorry for that. >> "talk back" question, what did you take away from the armstrong interview? facebook.com/carolcnn, or tweet me @carolcnn. stress sweat. it can happen any time, to anyone!
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now's your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day, the question for you this morning, what did you take away from the armstrong interview? we are so over you, lance. so over. after the interview the backlash was quick and fierce. yahoo! called it a sociopathic spectacle adding if you never met this jerk, well, count your blessings. armstrong told oprah he couldn't even remember how many people he sued for in effect telling the truth! it says a lot about a man when on his own apology tour he's not sure who to apologize to. the wife of three-time tour de france winner greg lemond said, quote, i can't describe to you the level of fear he brings to a family other than to liken it to a drunken alcoholic abusive spouse who gets out of jail with a bouquet of roses for his bloody spouse, saying, here, i'm sorry, i did that. example betsy andreu, the wife of former teammate frankie
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andreu who testified she'd heard armstrong admit to doping. for years armstrong buried her in insults calling her crazy and derailing her husband's career. they since talked but armstrong said, he couldn't discuss much of that conversation. >> i think she'd be okay with me saying this, but -- i mean, i can take the liberty to say it. i said, hey, listen, i called you crazy, i called you a bitch, and i called you all these things, but i never called you fat. >> talk about digging the hole deeper. well, lance, betsy andreu is definitely not okay with that. >> this is a guy who used to be my friend who decimated me. he could have come clean. he owed it to me. he owes it to the sport. that he destroyed. >> but it's not just about the sport armstrong may have destroyed. it's about the lives he destroyed through years of bullying and legal retaliation, the victims, often friends and
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teammates, left with careers and reputations ruined. bank accounts depleted. "talk back" what did you take away from the armstrong interview? facebook.com/carolcnn. facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me @carolcnn. i'll be right back. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes.
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overmany discounts to thine customers! [old english accent] safe driver, multi-car, paid in full -- a most fulsome bounty indeed, lord jamie. thou cometh and we thy saveth! what are you doing? we doth offer so many discounts, we have some to spare. oh, you have any of those homeowners discounts? here we go. thank you. he took my shield, my lady. these are troubling times in the kingdom. more discounts than we knoweth what to do with. now that's progressive.
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good morning. i'm carol costello, thank you so much for being with us. at 30 minutes past the hour, time to check our top stories. right now in north africa the u.s. is evacuating americans from people -- from other nations who were caught up in the hostage-taking by islamic terrorists in algeria. in the meantime, efforts continue to create other
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hostages, possibly including more americans still being held at the gas plant. algerian state media reports that about 650 people most of them algerians have been freed so far. we're also learning more about the terrifying ordeal itself. one hostage told his brother the kidnappers bound his hands with rope, duct taped his mouth and tied plastic explosives arounds had neck. that man managed to escape by running for his life with the bomb still strapped to his body. defense secretary leon panetta issued a stern warning to the kidnappers today -- >> the terrorists should be on notice that they will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, not in north africa, not anywhere. those who would wantonly attack our country and our people will have no place to hide.
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>> the algerian military without consulting the united states launched a raid that britain said left nearly 30 british and other people unaccounted for. authorities at miami's international airport are trying to figure out why two planes bumped into each other on the runway, 350 passengers en route to france had to switch planes for their trip. just this morning the white house unviled president obama's new official portrait. you're looking at it. it's a photograph taken in the oval office. the president is wearing an american flag pin on his lapel and, of course, the great big smile. his hair looks a little grayer than it did in his firstportrai. now lance armstrong is finally coming clean in an interview with oprah winfrey armstrong wasn't overly emotional, in fact, his body language tells a completely
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different story. susan constantine is a body language expert. good morning. >> good morning, carol. >> you know, one of the noticeable habits armstrong displayed in last night's interview was he kept touching his face and covering his mouth. let's watch. >> and that's -- no. i didn't, that was true. that was true. >> 11 of the 2000 tour, stopping
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at a hotel. tyler hamilton said you stopped at a hotel. how did it all work? >> i -- i viewed it as very simple, and for most of my career, there wasn't that much
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of that. again, just trying to perpetuate the story. ferrari and, again, it's -- it's hard to talk about some of these things. >> susan, what does that tell you? >> well, when people put their hands over their mouth, if you can imagine like a little kid that's about ready to tell a
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lie, what do they do, they put their hands over their mouth. what he does is taking a fishing net kind of scooping it up and putting the words back in his mouth, putting his hands to hold the words in. i'm also going to pacify myself, it's a self-soothing gesture, it will be okay. hang in there, it will be all right. basically what that is he's trying to hold back his words which usually lies. >> you think armstrong seemed arrogant. one part at the start of the interview stood out to you. let's listen. >> yes or no, did you ever take banned substances to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes. >> yes, or no, was one of those banned substances epo? >> yes. >> did you ever blood dope or use blood transfusions to enhance your cycling performance? >> yeah. >> did you ever use any other banned substances like testosterone, cortisone or human growth hormone? >> yeah. >> yes or no, in all seven of your tour de france victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. >> in your opinion was it humanly possible to win the tour de france without doping? seven times in a row. >> not in my opinion. >> okay. that last thing he did with his mouth, how would you characterize that? >> well, you notice that his mouth was more stretched and he kind of tucks his lips in, that's frustration almost emerging arrogance and anger combined together. it's a cluster gesture. so then he puts his hand over his mouth, again, scooping up the words. pgo th onoan t hdiwh hoan actually kept his hands in his lap, making his body language small, so when you're not feeling so powerful, you then
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close your body language in. but then what he's trying to do is to have you look at him and send the message that he's confident by crossing his legs. but there's also moments where he actual lly grabs his legs wi both of his hands bracing himself to protect himself. >> wow. body language expert, susanne constantine, thank you so much for your insight. it was interesting. >> thanks, carol. this news just in to cnn, moments ago the centers for disease control and prevention released brand-new numbers on the flu outbreak. this is part of its report. it says now 30 states reporting high levels of flu activity, six more states than last week. 48 states now have widespread flu activity. and more older americans are being hospitalized with the flu. joining us on the phone right now dr. sanjay gupta, cnn's chief medical correspondent. what else did this report say, sanjay? >> it sort of confirmed i think what we were suspecting, that you can't sort of draw a trajectory from one data point.
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last week we thought maybe it was heading down now, is it going to be getting better. and it really is sort of fitting with what you'd expect. we're sort of about halfway, a little bit more than halfway through the flu season, and the numbers have gotten worse. they also looked specifically at the flu vaccine and i think some of the initial estimates are about 60% effective. and they're finding that that's not right. that's 62% effective. again, as we talked about before, carol, it doesn't mean that right when you get a flu shot that you're protected. usually takes a couple weeks for the immunity to build in. but it's sort of fitting not only with what flu seasons are like. earlier this year, but even more specifically what this flu virus h3n2 is like. we've seen it before. it's sort of doing the same thing. >> all right, dr. sanjay gupta, thank you so much for clarifying, we appreciate it. it can propel little-known actors to fame, the sundance film festival now under way. nichelle turner is there. >> reporter: and the festival's
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founder robert redford said when it happens he's become a proud papa, we're live later when the "cnn newsroom" with carol costello continues. paradise! pack your bags, we'll leave tonight. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a travel agency. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein.
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the sundance film festival
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in full force. thousands of people are in attendance. it's one of the world's largest independent film festivals, it can set trends and influence our culture and even our politics. nischelle turner is in park city, utah, this morning. you got to talk to robert redford. >> reporter: i know, right? and i say we do a lot of celebrity interviews and i do a lot of them, but it's a little bit of a moment when robert redford walks into a room and it was definitely that yesterday. you know, carol, you talked about that politics takes center stage a lot of times at the sundance film festival, there are a lot of political films and documentary that premiere here, we'll see documentaries about dick cheney and wikileaks and the occupy wall street movement and there are also documents about anita hill and jim mcgreevey that will be premiering here, and i'll be sitting down with both of them later in the day. robert redford never bites his tongue when it comes to all
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things politics and what we talked about is what he would like to see with the inauguration coming up in a couple of days from president obama in the next four years. take a listen to what he has to say -- >> i would like to see him pay attention to more environmental issues. i think it's too dire. i think the situation is too dire. the law of entropy is so extreme right now. the planet is shrinking. it's being divvied up, carved up, dug up, and what are we thinking about future generations? are we going to leave them anything? and so i think it's in the hands of leadership and also the public to speak to this. i hope he does. >> reporter: now, we also talked about the fact that there's little-known films that become big hits here at sundance. one of the things we saw this year was the film "beast of the southern wild" that debuted last year at sundance and now is nominated for four oscars, when i asked robert redford about that, he kind of puffed up a little bit, and said, yeah, when these things happen, i definitely become a proud papa.
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>> i get. new jersey governor chris christie is known far beyond the garden state for his blunt talk. now he's turning his attention to the nra. mine was earned in djibouti, africa, 2004. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. i'm having one right now.ream? i don't want to be disturbed. and i won't. because before i went to sleep, i set this. now my iphone knows not to ring, unless its important.
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the fallout from the nra's latest ad continues. the gun rights group decision to
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make the president obama ad drawing sharp criticism from the left and the right. now new jersey governor chris christie is weighing in. >> and to talk about the president's children or any public officer's children who have not by their own choice but by requirement to have protection and to use that somehow to try to make a political point i think is reprehensible. >> in an interview with cnn, nra president david keene said the ad was not specifically about the obama daughters but about children who attend schools with private security. the group labeled the president a hypocrite for opposing what he called, quote, the same sort of protection for all children. and the obama daughters aren't the only kids in the national spotlight this week. we first saw these kids standing behind the president at the white house as he unveiled his proposal to end gun violence in america, and now we're hearing from those children in new
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videos posted on the white house youtube channel. >> dear president obama, i think there should be some changes in the law with guns. it's a free country, but i recommend there needs to be a limit with guns. >> and i'm ready to ask you to start gun laws. i am very sad about the children who lost their lives in connecticut, so i thought i would write to you to stop gun violence. >> mr. president, can we do something which will stop all of these terrible problems? after watching the news all day on friday, one question pops in my head and that question is, can we stop using guns? >> the obama administration has come under fire for incorporating the children into that news conference. some conservatives say the children are being used as props. and this weekend scores of children, their parents, and others will descend on washington ahead of president obama's inauguration.
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the chairs are being placed. dress rehearsals are taking place, but if you're headed to d.c., you better bundle up because the forecast calls for flurries on inauguration day. national guardsmen from more than 25 states making their way to the nation's capital. an estimated 6,000 will be on hand to help with security. and while it may be crowded on the roads, the scene will be a little less hectic at dulles international, the region's busiest airport may close one of its runways to accommodate the private planes flying in some parts -- flying in vips from across the country. our own vip, wolf blitzer, he'll be hosting "the situation room" live from the national mall this afternoon, that starts at 4:00 p.m. eastern and we'll have special inauguration coverage all this weekend sta starting on sunday and morning at 9:00 eastern. the mayor is a big fan of the town's sports team, why does he keep screwing up the players' names? she knows you like no one else.
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oh, carlos diaz told me a joke that i will not repeat on television! >> too soon? what? pardon me? >> we're not saying it. let's talk about the road to the super bowl because it's going through atlanta and foxborough on sunday, the nfc title game begins at 3:00 eastern with the falcons hosting the san francisco 49ers and the afc championship starts at 6:30, the baltimore ravens at the new
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england patriots battle it out. carlos diaz from hln sports is here to talk about fun stories before the kickoff and we'll talk about patriots and their mayor thomas menino, was trying to do some trash talk and didn't get the players' names right. we'll look at that and please expound after. >> sure. >> we have tom brady here. we have tom brady here. we have tom brady here. he's been our point person all season long. >> okay. >> and stevan ridley and another guy. and walcott -- wilfork. and hernandez will do a great job as he steps in because gronk is hurt. >> he had a cheat sheet. >> and you didn't even follow it and our wearing vince wilfork's jersey and if you're wearing his jersey and you messed it up, we
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have issues and gonk? it's gronk, gronkowski, all right? i know he's out with an injury but come on. i thought it was embarrassing when he talked about larry bird and referred to him as larry sparrow. no, that didn't happen. you got to get the names right. luckily there's very few sports fans in boston for your re-election hopes. the bets he has with the baltimore mayor they are exchanging food and judging from the photo this is not something he needs to do right now. >> oh! >> we need a better bet. the bets of exchanging food -- >> have you ever had a baltimore crab cake? >> okay, they have great crab cakes in new england as well. >> no, they don't. baltimore has the best! >> you need to have better bets. they're just exchanging food. >> all right, whatever, let's talk about the ravens defensive coordinator and how he's going to contain tom brady. >> this is spectacular. he's going to go all tonya harding, he said, he wants to spray water near the patriots bus as tom brady's getting off because if you've seen tom brady
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in this postseason he's been unstoppable and tom brady is looking to go to yet another super bowl, more super bowls than anyone else in the history of the nfl, six super bowls which would be unbelievable, unprecedented, he looks as good now as he did when he was going to his first super bowl. i'm talking about on the field, all right, carol, control yourself. >> i couldn't resist. >> that's a great point, though, on a serious note the ravens defensive coordinator used to be the defensive coordinator for the patriots, he went against tom brady in practice for years, so that could be a very good sign for the ravens. >> speaking of the 49ers, the "sports illustrated" might do him in. >> colin kaepernick, the quarterback for the niners. >> he's on the cover! >> he's on the cover, okay? but here's the things he has going for him, first off, he ran for 181 yards last week which is unbelievable. then he's got this whole kaepernicking thing. it's not tee bbowing, it's kaepernicking where he kisses
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his biceps when he scores, very nice. he's an inspirational story. he was adopted. there's the cammer nicking right there. his tattoos some of them have bible scripture. he's very popular amongst the ladies and his jersey is the most popular among women in the last few months. >> oh. >> i'm just saying, he had an amazing performance -- to be serious, he had one of the most amazing performances out of a quarterback ever last week against the packers. it's going to be very tough as a second-year guy to have that same kind of performance against the atlanta falcons in atlanta on sunday. >> yes, the upunderestimated atlanta falcons. >> a homer. >> well -- >> here we go, we'll pick caroled super bowl, vegas, are you listening, what do you have? ravens against the patriots, who will win that game? >> ravens. >> and the falcons against the niners. >> i like the bird matchup. >> you're going all birds. >> all birds, baby. how about you?
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go ahead, do the patriots. everybody picks the patriots. >> patriots against the niners. i'm going exactly the opposite. patriots/niners. i'm sorry, there are custodians in the building at cnn atlanta, i might have to take monday off if the falcons lose, because there's a lot of trash talking going. >> if you lose the bet, i want some crab cakes. >> i'm going to give carol some crab cake if i lose the bet. i'm telling you right now, all right? >> i'm not going to give you anything, okay? >> like it is every day on the air, carol. >> thanks, carlos. it was fun. we'll be right back. 's cere. fiber one. uh, forgot jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's for breakfast? um... try the number one! yeah, this is pretty good. [ male announcer ] over a third of a day's fiber. fiber one.
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a story a lot of people are talking about lance armstrong's conversation with oprah winfrey. throughout the interview armstrong alluded to the persuasive culture of doping during his time in elite cycling but he didn't offer it as an excuse. >> you said to me earlier you don't think it was possible to win without doping. >> not in that generation, and i'm not here to talk about others in that generation. it's been well documented. i didn't invent the culture, but i didn't try to stop the culture and that's my mistake and that's what i have to be sorry for and that's what something -- and the sport is now paying the price because of that. and so i am sorry for that.